William F. Koch, Ph. D., M. D.

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KOCH COOK BOOK / INDIAN SUN SYMBOL - 1935

DEDICATION

To Our Dear Mothers who were sick unto death with that which all living mortals so fear and dread—CANCER. To your Mother or Father, brother or sister: To all members of the human family that wish to lose their fear and dread of CANCER; This Koch Cancer Cook Book is affectionately dedicated.

FIRST EDITION COPYRIGHTED, 1935

INTRODUCTION

In the enclosed volume the author wishes to express what she feels are the first steps on the road to correct eating, to gain and maintain a life that is pulsating with joyous health.

In offering this small Koch Cancer Cook Book to the thousands of hungry seekers of health, the author is simply answering the demands of thousands upon thousands suffering with Cancer and its allied diseases who ask over and over again each day, “WHAT SHALL I EAT?” “HOW SHALL I PREPARE IT SO AS TO MAKE IT BOTH TASTY AND NUTRITIOUS?”

In the preparation of this Cancer Cook Book, the author wishes to thank her many friends for their aid and willingness to spread cheer to the thousands that will read and use these recipes. Among those who have made suggestions, Mrs. Florence Crabb is especially thanked. She has fed thousands of Cancer Sufferers using the Koch Cancer Antitoxin and after using her recipes and proving their worth, they are grouped with the author’s and passed on to you for enjoyment. The Koch Cancer Foundation is thanked sincerely for their cooperation in making this Koch Cancer Cook Book possible.

Actual experience gained from the handling of hundreds of Cancer Sufferers over a period of seven years and a careful study of foods convinces the author that those in distress, those seeking aid from the Koch Treatment or any other remedial agent do not have anything reliable to which they can turn and find easy and specific instructions as to what to eat and how to prepare it. The problem of feeding is a big job. The sufferer has for years eaten the “American Substantial Daily menus of—meats gravies, white bread, pies, condiments, coffees, teas, desserts, etc.,” so long they are absolutely lost when they find that to regain their lost health they must forsake their “old standby daily rations.” This fact and truth startles them. They are absolutely lost. They are unable to think of other combinations of tasty, palatable, and nutritious foods. For this reason the author has taken much pains and study as well as years of actual preparation of these proven recipes and these groups of foods in getting material for this Koch Cancer Cook Book and securing this Cook Book published for your benefit and aid.

There are hundreds of cookbooks on the market, but they are absolutely of no value to the Cancer Sufferer. This is the first Cook Book of its kind and it is with pleasure and much pride that the author asks that you read carefully, follow its instructions rigidly, as every recipe has been used dozens and dozens of times and the combinations of foods carefully selected of those foods that are permissible for the user of the Koch Cancer Antitoxin. It is this combination of “permissibles” that has taken so much time and work to make this book possible. You will note there are many cereals or grain products used and permitted. These grains should always be used as “whole grains, flours, meals, cereals, etc.” Never use the bolted meals and flours. Note carefully—THE LESS STARCHES YOU USE, and all cereals are starches, THE BETTER OFF YOU WILL BE AND THE LESS GAS YOU WILL HAVE. CUT YOUR CONSUMPTION OF BREAD AND STARCHES TO THE MINIMUM.

Pay close attention to the combination of foods— GOOD COMBINATIONS, and BAD COMBINATIONS FOR THE HEALTH SEEKER that follow.

You are especially cautioned not to make your recovery harder and longer than it should be by telling yourself, “I can’t follow this old horrid diet.” “This is terrible,” “I must have my coffee.” “My eggs and milk are my staff of life.” “I cannot eat whole-wheat bread.” and a dozen other such useless sayings. You must not fail before you try. You must realize that. “If what you have been eating all your life was correct you would not now be sick.” You must remember that your body is the sum total of “what you eat, drink, and how you think.” Your mucous forming foods will in time clog your system and give you grief. They break down your eliminative organs, as they increase their work. All starches are mucous and gas forming. Eggs, meats, and such are putrefactive foods, besides being “second-handed foods.” You are neither a bird that eats seeds and grain nor are you a lion that eats meat only. You are a combination of all animals below you and you will do well not to emulate any one species in your eating habit.

Get a clear picture of yourself in perfect health: well, happy, and useful—as you were once in life. Take this mental picture of what you want to be and set it before your mind’s eye and keep it there all the time. Make up your mind to do everything possible to bring about the manifestation of the perfect “you” which you have made for your “mental eye” to look at all times. Give up all past habits and ways of living that have made you “what you now are”—Quit the “tasty” so-called foods, the things you like best, and the pessimistic thoughts and your own weakness and habit of saying “I CAN’T.” Learn this little poem and say it every day—

“One ship drives east and one drives west,
While the self same breezes blow:
‘Tis the set of the sails and not the gales
That determines the way they go.
Like the birds of the air are the ways of fate.
As we journey along through life
‘Tis the set of the soul that determines the goal. And not the storm and the strife.” Lene.

Become master of yourself and your taste. Be an image of the Creator that made you. Reflect a credit to your maker. Make yourself over in the likeness of the Spirit that made, repairs, and keeps you. You can if you will only think and act the part. Follow the foods as herein outlined. Refuse to be a quitter. Remember the Creative Intelligence that made you in the beginning is still with you and is remaking you of the things you eat, drink and the thoughts you think.

If you follow your foods, drinks, and keep happy creative and determined thoughts before you—stick to your doctor that has recommended the use of the Koch Treatment—use as many treatments as may be necessary—taking time for the God within you to remake you—you will get well. The author has seen the useless made useful, the hopeless made hopeful, the dying made to live again—not in one case, but in hundreds, and knows that you too have a wonderful chance to become useful to yourself and loved ones again. The author has prepared thousands of meals for such as you and has every confidence in the world that the only Treatment worth using is the one you have used and that your doctor is worthy and capable of directing you all the way back to health and happiness. You must be willing and fight for the realization of that picture of yourself, as you want it to be.

The joy that comes in handing this Special Koch Cancer Cook Book to you is greater than you shall ever know. You read, study, follow instructions, and a greater joy—HEALTH will come to you.

May the book serve the purpose for which it was intended, i.e., a bright light to make easy your problem of eating and rebuilding your body. My ardent desire is that the joy of living might once more become the possession of all sufferers.

Sincerely,
Olga C. Compete.

 

DIET

The idea of the diet is to nourish the patient sufficiently, and at the same time maintain a normal blood chemistry, to avoid all irritants, stimulants, and toxic substances in the sense that they hamper the progress of normal intracellular reactions, and to feed such materials that are conducive to best digestive activities and bowel action.

FOOD ESSENTIALS

In order to maintain life and health, foods must contain vitamins, mineral salts, protein fat, carbohydrates and water.

If our food is lacking in vitamins, deficiency diseases result, such as neuritis, scurvy, rickets, paralysis. Some of these vitamins are destroyed by heat. Therefore, some of the food must be eaten raw. The foods rich in vitamins are the fresh fruits, the green vegetables and the dairy products.

Our bodies contain 16 different mineral salts. If our food does not supply these, disease results. The source of mineral salts is fruit, green vegetables, the skin of fruits and tubers and the germ and hulls of the cereals. Therefore, we must eat whole cereals, eat the skins of fruits and vegetables, and save and drink every bit of pot liquor in which the green vegetables are cooked.

CLASSIFIED LIST

After the antitoxin has been given the diet should consist of the solid, raw or cooked foods, outlined below. This selection is made after much experience and is designed to include the non-injurious materials and to omit those, which tend to interfere with the recovery chemistry.

1. The restricted juice diet, together with the daily enemas, should continue for three or four days.

2. After the injection has been given, the patient can go on the classified diet but the daily enemas should be continued together with a little un medicated mineral oil, if that should become necessary, until two natural bowel movements a day are procured. After this result is obtained the enemas should be given twice a week.

3. No medication of any kind is necessary or permissible; no cathartics, nothing but hot or cold applications to control pain, or the smallest amount of morphine BY MOUTH only if that should become necessary.

CLASSIFIED LIST

What to Eat

Fruits (Ripe Only):

Apples
Loganberries
Bananas
Muskmelon
Dates
Ripe oranges
Cantaloupe
Pears
Figs
Pineapple
Grapes
Peaches
Fresh blackberries
Strawberries (picked ripe)
Fresh blueberries
Raisins
Fresh huckleberries
Watermelon
Fresh raspberries

Nuts (All Must Be Chewed Well)

Soft shelled pecans
Peanuts, if agree
Hazelnuts or filberts
English Walnuts, if skin over kernels, remove by scalding till loose.
Almonds, unsalted
Cashew, unsalted

Grains and Cereals

Barley
Petty john
Ban
Post Toasties
Cornmeal
Puffed rice and wheat
Corn Flakes
Rice
Cracked Wheat
Rolled Oats
Cream of Wheat
Spaghetti
Grape Nuts
Shredded Wheat
Hominy
Vermicelli
Macaroni
Wheatena
Noodles
Whole Wheat
Oatmeal

Soups

Barley
Fruit
Bean
Pea (new or dried)
Celery
Rice (unpolished)
Corn
Thick soup
Cream
Vegetable NOTE—Do not use any spices, tomatoes or cubes in making soup. Must not use any canned soup.

Vegetables

Artichokes (Jerusalem)
Peas (new)
Beet tops
Peas dried
Brussels sprouts
Potatoes, baked or boiled
Butter beans mashed (sparingly)
Shelled new beans
Pumpkins
Cabbage
Salsify
Cauliflower
String beans
Carrots
Squash
Celery (raw or stewed)
Sweet potatoes (baked or boiled)
Corn (new)
Cucumbers
Turnips (white)
Kale
Turnip tops
Koirabi
Radishes
Lentils
Swiss chard
Lettuce
Wax beans
Dried lima beans
Watercress
Greens (all kinds except spinach)
Pure olive oil for salad dressings
Onions (for flavoring)
Where fresh vegetables are unobtainable, dried vegetables or vegetables which have been put up in glass containers (cold packed) are permissible.

Dairy Foods

Butter
Sweet Cream
Whole Milk

Bread

Bran
Pancakes (if no sour milk is used)
Bran muffins used)
Biscuit (whole wheat)
Rye bread and Rye Crisp
Corn bread
Whole wheat bread
Graham bread
Whole wheat wafers
Graham wafers
Whole wheat (toasted)

Beverages

Apple juice (made fresh)
Grape Juice made without preservative
Pear juice (made fresh)
Cream, one-half water
Cereal Coffees as: Moko Cereal Coffee
Distilled water, all you can drink
Postum Cereal

Desserts

Whole wheat bread pudding
Vanilla ice cream
Rice pudding
Fruit ices
Whole-wheat plain cake
Jams
Pure honey Preserves (from permitted fruits)
Pure maple syrup
Brown sugar
Ice cream with fruits, allowable frozen
Jellies of allowable fruits
Santa Clara prune whip with vegetable gelatin

Condiments

Dilute hydrochloric acid diluted with water to taste, may be used as a vinegar substitute for those desiring such.

 

MUST NOT EAT While Under Treatment

Fruits

Cherries
Lemons
Cranberries
Limes
Currants
Plums
Gooseberries
Quinces
Grapefruit

Vegetables

Egg plant
Rhubarb
Parsley
Sauerkraut
Pepper grass
Spinach
Asparagus
Tomatoes

Dairy Foods

Buttermilk
Sour milk
Cheese (any kind)
Sour cream

Must not eat poultry, fish, eggs or meat except on advice of physician.

Desserts

Chocolate ice cream
Nut ice cream
Chocolate pudding
Junket
Egg custard
Spanish cream

Candies

No candies, chewing gum, nuts, fruit or chocolate. etc.

Condiments

Bottle sauces
Mustard
Catsup
Pepper
Ginger
Spices
Horseradish
Vinegar

Beverages

Alcohol
Ginger Ale
Beer
Lemonade
Champagne
Mineral waters
Cordials Spirits
Coffee
Tea
Cocoa
Wine
Carbonated water
Postum (Instant)
Chocolate

 

BRIEF HEALTH GUIDE

1. Get plenty of fresh air day and night. Oxygen is necessary to all body functions. Breathe deeply.

2. Sip a glass of warm water, or water with orange juice upon arising, helps clean the stomach for the meal to follow. Orange is an alkalinizer. This habit aids elimination of body wastes.

3. Drink plenty of water during the day. Water is needed for all body processes.

4. Bathe daily or rub the skin with a coarse, dry towel. Some of the body wastes are eliminated through the skin. Pores must be kept clean to facilitate elimination.

5. Let the diet lean toward alkaline foods. The body is not healthy if the blood and tissues are acid.

6. Masticate all foods thoroughly, especially starches. The digestion of starches starts in the mouth.

7. Exercise daily. Exercise all muscles in some sport especially enjoyed. Unused muscles lose their tone.

8. Keep the bowels clean. Eat plenty of roughage. When necessary use mineral oils, which are lubricants. Laxatives are usually harmful,

9. Try to keep the mind free from worry. Take up an interesting hobby or study.

10. Hold your temper: don’t let it hold you!

 

TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

Always Use Level Measurements

3 teaspoons—equal to 1 tablespoon

1 6 tablespoons—equal to 1 cup

1 cup—equal to 1/2 pint

2 cups—equal to 1 pint

4 cups (2 pints)—equal to 1 quart

2 tablespoons butter—equal to 1 ounce

1/2 cup butter—equal to 1/4 pound

4 cups (2 pints)—equal to 1 pound

2 cups granulated sugar—equal to 1 pound

2 2/3 cups powdered sugar—equal to 1 pound

31/2 cups confectioner’s sugar—equal to 1 pound

2 2/3 cups brown sugar—equal to 1 pound

10 eggs, without shells—equal to 1 pound

8 eggs, with shells—equal to 1 pound

1 square cooking chocolate—equal to 1 ounce

1/3 cup chopped nuts—equal to 1 ounce

1 pint chopped meat, solid—equal to 1 pound

How to Measure in Cooking

Measuring Utensils: Use standard glass measuring cup with numbers showing fractional parts of a cupful. Have a set of measuring spoons in tablespoon and half tablespoon, teaspoon, half teaspoon, and salt-spoon size. These are accurate and not expensive.

To Measure Dry Ingredients: Fill cup or spoon and level off the top with blade of knife. Always sift flour, powdered sugar and confectioner’s sugar before measuring.

To Measure Liquids: When cupful or spoonful is called for, fill to the very top. Use standard measuring cup to measure fractional parts of a cupful.

To Measure Fats: Butter, lard and other solid fats should be packed solidly into the cup or spoon and leveled off with a knife. When the recipe calls for a certain quantity of melted butter, measure after melting. If it calls for butter melted, measure first, and then melt.

 

FOR THE PLEASANT AND PERFECT HARMONY OF LIVING

COMBINATIONS TO AVOID

Meat and starches; sweet fruits and starches; meat and sweet foods; starch and acid fruits or acids.

STARCHY FOODS

Irish Potato
Dry Beans
Sweet Potato
Dry Lima Beans
All grains and cereals
Macaroni
Winter squash
Bananas
(Whole grains less starchy)
Peanuts
Flour
Lentils
Bread
Pumpkin
Rice
Yams

FOODS HEAVY IN SUGAR

Raw sugar
Dried Fruits:
Molasses
Figs. Dates. Raisins
Honey

ALKALINE-ASH FOODS

Olives
Potatoes
Dried beans, all kinds
Dried peas
Raisins
Apricots
Oranges
Pineapple
Bananas
String beans
Cauliflower
Peaches
Swiss chard
Cabbage
Almonds and almond butter
Apples
Parsnips
Pears
Sugar beet leaves
Radishes
Dates
Watermelon
Beets
Turnips
Brussels Sprouts
Milk
Carrots
Onions
Cucumbers
Green peas
Celery
Figs
Muskmelon
Mushrooms
Lettuce

ACID-PRODUCING FOODS

Egg yoke
Peanuts
Oysters, fresh
Corn, green
Cereals
Cranberries
Sardines
Pork, lean
Egg whole
Veal, loin
Beef, porterhouse
Ham, smoked
Chicken
Beef ribs, lean
Salmon, canned
Mutton, leg
Barley, pearl
Rice
Perch
Prunes
Corn
Halibut, fresh
Cheese, cheddar
Trout, salmon
Lentils
Crackers, soda
Bacon
Walnuts
Egg white
Breads

The ash of prunes and cranberries is alkaline in nature, but because of the un-oxidizable acid contained in them, they increase the acidity of the body.

NEUTRAL FOODS

Butter
Cornstarch
Cream
Cane sugar
Lard
Tapioca

FRUITS
Use in the Body

Fruits take an important place in the diet and must not be neglected. Some are alkalinizers, all are rich in minerals and vitamins, contain roughage and a large volume of the purest water nature provides. It is sometimes called living water. All ripe fruits also contain sugar in the natural form, the best way in which it can be taken into the body and used in the system. A large fruit bill is much better than a large doctor bill. Keep the system clean all winter with fruits and vegetables and a special spring housecleaning with strong drugs and herbs will not be necessary.

DRIED FRUITS

All dried fruit should be washed thoroughly. Cover the fruit with hot water and allow to soak over night. Next morning fruit may be warmed if desired. No sugar or other sweetening need be added. Do not drain off water. The morning meal should consist of some fruit dried fruit, fresh fruit or home canned—fresh or dried preferred. Eat all you want.

Those in ill health will be greatly benefited by an all fruit breakfast. Well-browned dry toast may be added, whole-wheat waffles, or cakes. A warm drink is desired by some, and Mo-ko is highly recommended, served with cream.

BAKED BANANAS
Fine For Breakfast.

Wash firm bananas and do not peel. Place in a shallow pan in medium oven (350° F.). Bake 20 to 30 minutes; remove skin and serve with butter and a sprinkling of sugar or serve in the skin.

BAKED APPLES
Wash, core and fill centers with raisins or dates. Allow 1/4 cup of sugar for 6 apples. Cover half way with water. Baste apples while baking. Raisins and dates can be omitted if one so desires.

Cantaloupes and watermelons are natural foods and can be eaten with practically all combinations. (Caution: Do not eat them chilled at breakfast, especially hyperacidity.)

BREADS
Use only: Sweet certified or raw milk
Shortening—pure lard, butter or Mazola Oil
Rumford’s Royal Baking Powder, or
Dr. Price’s Baking Powder.
DISTILLED WATER

LIMA BEAN MUFFINS
1/2 C. Whole wheat Flour 4 t. Brown sugar (or raw)
1/2 C. Lima bean flour 4 1/2 t. Butter
2/3 Cups sweet milk 2 t. Dr. Price’s Baking powder, or Royal Baking Powder
1/2 t. Salt
Mix dry ingredients.
Add milk and melted butter. Bake in a moderate oven (350° to 400° F.). Makes 10 muffins. Nuts, raisins or dates may be added. The Lima Bean Flour may be secured from the California Lima Bean Growers Association of Oxnard, California.

HOT BISCUITS
1 1/2 C. Graham flour 3 t. Baking powder
1/2 C. Whole wheat flour 1/4 t. Soda
Sift together in a bowl. Make a nest in middle of flour, drop in 2 tablespoons shortening. 1 cup milk, add 1/2 to shortening mixed well and gradually draw in flour. Add rest of milk, mixing whole as quickly as possible. Roll and cut. Bake in moderate oven (375° F.).

HONEY RAISIN BISCUITS
2 Cups flour
4 t. Baking powder
1/2 t. Salt
1 cup of Milk
4 T. Shortening

Honey paste
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 cup of Butter
1/4 cup un-sulphured raisins
1/4 cup chopped nuts
Honey Paste: Cream butter and honey and add fruit and nuts.

Biscuits
Sift dry ingredients together. Work in shortening and add liquid gradually. Mix to a soft dough. Put on floured board, about 1/4 inch thick. Spread the Honey Paste over the dough and roll like jelly roll. Cut in 3/4 inch slices and bake in buttered muffin pan. Bake 25 minutes at 400° F. This makes 12 biscuits.

WHOLE WHEAT MUFFINS
1 1/4 cups milk
1 1/4 cups whole-wheat flour
3 T. brown sugar
1/4 cup white flour
3 T. Mazola oil
1 salt
Bake in moderate oven (400* F.) 20 minutes.

NO. 1 CORN MUFFINS
1 cup corn meal
1 1/2cups milk
1 cup flour
2 T. melted butter
1 T. brown sugar
2 T. melted lard
1/2 t. salt
1 T. baking powder
Mix dry ingredients and stir in milk. Add shortening, beat well. Bake in muffin tins 25 minutes.

NO. 2 YELLOW CORN MEAL MUFFINS
1 1/2 cups sweet milk
1 1/2 cups corn meal
2 T. brown sugar
1 cup white flour
2 T. Mazola oil or butter
1/2 t. soda
3/4 T. salt
3 t. baking powder
Bake 25 minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with honey or maple syrup.

BRAN MUFFINS
1 3/4 cups milk
4 t. Dr. Price’s baking powder
4 T. melted butter or shortening
1 t. salt
1/4 cups Pillsbury Best flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 cups Pillsbury Bran
Sift all dry ingredients, and then add milk and melted shortening. Bake at 400° F. for 35 minutes.

GRAHAM FRUIT AND NUT MUFFINS
1/4 cups milk
3/4 cup chopped nuts and raisins
3 T. melted shortening
3 T. brown sugar
1 1/4 cups graham flour
3/4 t. salt
1 cup Pillsbury White Flour
3 t. Dr. Price’s baking powder
Bake in a moderate oven for 20 minutes.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD
1 cup Graham Flour
1 3/4 cups milk
1 1/2 cups sifted Pillsbury
1 level t. salt
White flour
3/4 cup pure cane syrup
1 cup corn meal
4 t. baking powder
Sift dry ingredients three times, add moist ingredients. Steam 3 1/2 hours in well-greased steamer.
One-cup raisins may be added if desired.

PRUNE BREAD
2 cups Pillsbury’s Graham
1/4 cup brown sugar
flour
1 cup prunes
1 cup Pillsbury’s Bran
1 cup milk
1 t. salt
1 T. shortening
2 t. baking powder
Soak and cook prunes, drain, stone and chop.
Sift three times the dry ingredients, add milk and beat well. Add prunes and melted shortening. Pour into greased loaf pan, and bake in a moderate oven, 350° F., about one hour.

ICE BOX WHOLE WHEAT ROLLS
1 pint warm milk
1/2 cup cubed potatoes
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 yeast cake
3/4 cup melted lard
1 t. Dr. Price’s baking powder
1 T. salt
1/2 t. soda
Enough flour to make a soft dough, half white flour and half whole-wheat flour. Put in covered dish in icebox or frigidaire. Will keep several days. Roll dough to about 1/2 inch thickness, cut out with biscuit cutter. Spread melted butter over each and fold over making pocketbook shaped rolls. Let raise 1 hour before baking. Bake 20 minutes in 400° F. oven.

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
1 cake Yeast
2 T. lard melted
1 cup scalded and cooled milk
4 cups Whole-wheat flour
4 T. raw sugar or brown
1 cup sifted white flour
sugar
1 t. salt
1 cup lukewarm water
Dissolve yeast and sugar in lukewarm liquid. Add lard or butter and salt, then flour gradually. Add enough to make a soft dough that can be handled. Knead thoroughly being sure to keep the dough soft. Cover and set aside in a warm place to rise for about 2 hours. When double in bulk, turn out on kneading board, mold into loaves, put in well-greased pans, and let rise for 30 minutes. Bake 1 hour in 375° F. oven.

WITH A YEAST “FERMENT”
The yeast “ferment” method given below is suited to farm homes since it makes use of noontime potato water. Rolls are ready for the next day’s dinner and yet there is not the danger of poorly flavored bread, which sometimes accompanies an overnight sponge method.
Make a yeast “ferment” or starter as follows:
1 cake dry yeast soaked in
1 potato mashed, and water to make 1 quart.
1 T. sugar
1/2 cup lukewarm water
Add sugar to potato water (and 1 t. salt if potato water is not salted). Cool to lukewarm before adding soaked yeast. Keep in a warm place (80° F.) 12 to 16 hours, before using. Stir well before taking out part of it. This amount makes about four loaves of bread.

CRACKED WHEAT BREAD—2 LOAVES
1 pint yeast ferment
2 T. fat
1 cup milk, scalded
2 t. salt
2 cups cracked wheat
3 cups each white and graham flour
1/4 cup dark corn syrup or brown sugar
Pour hot milk over cracked wheat, sugar and fat in a bowl. Cool to lukewarm, add yeast ferment, graham and white flour and knead to a soft dough. Let rise to double, divide into loaves, roll into shape and put in greased pans to rise until half again as high. Bake one hour, first in hot, and then reduce to moderate oven.

WHITE BREAD—2 LOAVES
1 pint yeast ferment
6 cups sifted flour
1 T. sugar
1 1/2 t. salt
2 T. melted, cooled fat
Mix in a bowl, adding yeast, sugar, and shortening to flour and salt. Knead lightly until dough is smooth and elastic.

VEG-NUT BREAD
1 cup ground or finely grated carrots
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/3 cup white flour or enough to hold dough together
1 apple, shredded fine
1/4 cup ground nuts and some raisins, if desired
Bake in slow oven about 300° F. about 1 hour and 20 minutes.

OAT MEAL BREAD
1 cup Oat Meal
Add enough water to cook. While warm add I cup raw or brown sugar, butter size of walnut and 1-teaspoon salt. Dissolve 1 yeast cake in 2 teaspoons warm water. Add to above mixture and let rise. Then add sufficient whole wheat or graham flour to knead. Keep a soft dough. Let raise for 2 hours and mold into loaves. Bake in moderate oven 375° F. for 3/4 hours.

RYE BREAD
2 cups of scalded milk
1/2 cup lukewarm water
1 t. salt
4 cups of Rye flour
2 T. raw sugar
Enough wheat flour for kneading
2 T. shortening
2 cakes of yeast or 3 cakes
Let rise about two hours. Makes two loaves.
Bake in moderate oven.

WHOLE WHEAT NUT BREAD
4 cups Whole Wheat flour
1 cup chopped raisins
1/3 cup brown sugar
4 t. baking powder
1 cup chopped nuts
2 cups sweet milk
Mix dry ingredients, add liquids and let stand one half hour. Then bake one half hour in moderate oven.

OAT MEAL BREAD
Makes Two Loaves
1 cake Fleischmann’s yeast
2 T melted shortening
1 1/2 lukewarm water
4 cups sifted flour half whole wheat
2 cups boiling water
2 cups rolled oats
1 t. salt
1/4 cup brown sugar
Pour two cups of boiling water over Oat Meal, cover, and let stand until lukewarm; or Oat Meal left from breakfast may be used. Dissolve yeast and sugar in 1/2 cup lukewarm water. Add shortening, yeast and sugar to oatmeal and water. Add one-cup flour, beat well. Cover and let rise for one hour in moderately warm place. Add remainder of flour and knead well. Let rise until double in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours. Mould into loaves, let rise again 3/4 hour. Bake in hot oven 45 minutes.

BUTTER BREAD
Serve Hot With Soup or Salad.
Remove crusts from one loaf of bread and slice in one-fourth inch slices; place slices together again and tie them loosely with a string. Spread with liberal amount of butter on top, about one-fourth inch thick: lay in a covered dish and bake in a hot oven (450° F.) for 30 minutes.
NOTE: A clove of garlic, grated and mixed with the butter gives the bread a delicious flavor.

OLD-FASHIONED BUCKWHEAT CAKES
Dissolve 1/2 cake yeast in 1-quart lukewarm water. Add enough buckwheat flour to make a soft batter. Set in warm place over night. Pour out desired amount and thin with lukewarm water. Dissolve 1/2-teaspoon soda for each cup of batter. To remainder of batter add small amount of salt and sugar and 1 teaspoonful of white flour every third night. Keep in cool place.

HUCKLEBERRY GRIDDLE CAKES
1/2 cup graham or whole-wheat flour
3. T. baking powder
1 cup milk
1/2 t. salt
2 T. melted lard or butter
2 T. brown or raw sugar
1 cup huckleberries
Sift the flour, Baking Powder and salt, add sugar, then the milk to make a smooth batter. Add shortening and berries last. Fry on griddle, not too hot.

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES
1 cup sweet milk
3/4 cup yellow corn meal
1 T. brown or raw sugar
3/4 cup white flour
3 T. pure lard or Mazola oil
3 t. baking powder
Sift all dry ingredients; add sugar and flour and shortening. Beat to a smooth batter and fry on griddle, not too hot. 1/3 cup of cooked brown rice may be added.

WAFFLES
1 cup milk
2 T. corn starch, sifted with
3 t. baking powder
2 1/2 t. Mazola oil
3 T. syrup
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 egg, well beaten
1/3 cup white flour
1/2 t. salt
Bake in waffle iron until a golden brown.

 

SOUPS:

CORNMEAL GRUEL
Wash six tablespoonful of yellow cornmeal through cold water several times. Last time let settle and pour off water. Take four tablespoonful of this meal, add one-quart boiling water, simmer slowly for two hours, strain and place in icebox. To serve, take 2/3 cup gruel, beat, add salt to taste and two tablespoonful whipped cream. Stir two minutes.

BARLEY SOUP
1 cup whole barley
1/2 cup chopped celery
4 cups water
2 cups beef bone stock
1 chopped onion
Cook the barley for 1 1/2 hours, then add onion and celery, and cook 30 minutes more. Last add beef bone stock and reheat. Season to taste.

PUREE—SPLIT GREEN PEA SOUP
Soak over night in half quart water one cup of dried split peas. Then cook slowly for one hour, press through sieve. To one cup of pea pulp, add soup stock or rich milk until ingredients have the consistency of soup. Add one tablespoonful butter and a little salt.

LENTIL SOUP
To 2 cups of cooked and mashed lentils, add soup stock or rich milk to give desired amount. A teaspoonful of butter may be added. Salt to taste or use celery salt. Barley, rice and beans may be used instead of lentils.

CELERY SOUP
Dice fine one bunch celery. Cook well in one pint distilled water until done. Add salt to taste and 1/2 pint cream with a little butter and flour to thicken.

CREAM OF POTATO SOUP
3 or 4 potatoes
1 small onion, Cut fine.
Cook in distilled water until potato can be mashed. Add 1/2 pint cream. Serve with toasted whole wheat bread.

BEAN SOUP
Bean soup, made with pork hock, celery and onion, is every good. Follow recipe for Puree or Pea Soup.

BARLEY GRUEL
Put half pint of milk in double boiler; add one level teaspoonful of barley flour moistened with a little cold milk. Soak one hour and cook at least twenty minutes. Add salt to taste. Serve with cream.

SOUP STOCK
To make good nutritious soup, a stock made of soup bones, which can be gotten at any meat market, should be used. Put in large Columbia ware kettle, cover with water and cook all of two hours. Put in fruit jars and keep cold. Then any vegetable may be added with salt to taste. Serve hot.

VEGETABLE SOUP
Shred vegetables on Wonder Shredders medium sized shredder two carrots, two turnips, one potato, one large onion, diced small, one stalk celery, one cup of string beans cut small, salt to taste. Add these to above soup stock and cook until tender. The soup is made more attractive when vegetables are shredded.
The same vegetables may be boiled in 1 1/2 quarts of water to which has been added 1/4 cup butter. Serve with vegetable crackers.

PUREE OF PEA
Soak one-pint yellow or green split peas over night: cook in water enough to cover, with one small onion and a little chopped celery. Let simmer gently for two hours, and then rub through colander. Reheat; add water to make two quarts. Let boil a few minutes season and add butter. Serve with tiny squares of well-coasted whole wheat bread.

 

SALAD DRESSING:

BOILED DRESSINGS
2 T. flour
1 cup rich milk
2 T. butter
1/3 cup orange juice
2 T. brown sugar
1/2 t. or more of hydrochloric acid (dilute)
1 t. salt
Melt butter and add flour. Mix with other, dry ingredients and then add milk slowly. Cook in a double boiler until thickened. When partly cool, add orange juice and (dilute) hydrochloric acid. One cup of whipped cream may be added when cold.

OIL DRESSINGS
1 cup pure olive oil
1 t. sugar
1 t. (dilute) hydrochloric acid
1/2 t. celery seed
1/2 t. salt
Beat all together. This dressing is good to use for cabbage salad or slaw for endive salad or kidney bean salad.

RAW CAULIFLOWER SALAD DRESSING
One cup whipped cream and one crushed banana make an excellent dressing. Separate cauliflower and place in ice water in which some salt has been added. Serve when crisp with whipped cream banana dressing.

COFFEE CREAM DRESSING
1 pint coffee cream
1/4 t. salt
1 T. brown sugar
1/2 t. celery salt
Cook in double boiler, adding one tablespoonful cornstarch to thicken. When cool, beat until light and add 10 drops of hydrochloric acid (dilute).

NUT BUTTER DRESSING
Use 1/2 cup of any permissible nut butter. Add enough milk or water to make the consistency of dressing. Honey or sugar may be added. Good for fruit or lettuce salad.

 

SALADS:

NO. 1 BANANA SALAD
4 bananas, diced
1 small bunch celery
4 large apples. diced
Mix well together, serve on lettuce leaves. Use sweet apple juice for dressing.

NO. 2 BANANA SALAD
Cut each banana in half lengthwise and place on lettuce on a salad plate. Cover with cream dressing. Sprinkle freely with chopped nuts or make a dressing from Almond or Pecan Butter by adding enough cream or water to make a dressing consistency.

CELERY, NUT AND APPLE SALAD
Cut into small pieces one apple and one half cup tender part of celery, diced. Chop one half-cup nuts any kind except salted. Mix and serve on lettuce or romaine leaves with mayonnaise or cream dressing.

STUFFED PEAR SALAD
Place cored halves of pears on lettuce leaves. Fill the cavities with dates cut fine, mixed with chopped nuts; serve with cream dressing or nut butter dressing.

NO. 2 STUFFED PEAR SALAD
Place cored halves of pears on lettuce leaves; fill the cavities with dates cut fine, mixed with chopped nuts; pour over this a mayonnaise dressing thinned with cream.

DATE AND CELERY SALAD
Use equal parts of chopped dates and celery. Serve on lettuce leaves or endive. Use dressing to suit the taste. Cream dressing is very good.

GRAPE SALAD
Select large sweet grapes. Cut or chop 1 cup full. One large sweet apple, diced, 1/2 cup chopped dates and 1 cup chopped celery. Serve with mayonnaise dressing on lettuce leaf.

FRUIT SALAD
1 cup diced apples
1 cup diced bananas
1 cup diced oranges
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Mix well, put in molds and cool. Serve with nut butter or cream dressing.

DATE AND NUT SALAD
Wash and stone dates. Place one whole nutmeat in center of each date. Place four or five lettuce leaves in a circle, place spoonful of cream dressing in center and top with a raisin.

APPLE AND RAISIN SALAD
3 cups diced sweet apples
1/4 cup orange juice
1 cup cut or coarsely ground, chopped nuts, if desired raisins.
Mix well and serve.

 

VEGETABLE SALADS:

CABBAGE SALADS
Shred a firm head of cabbage on medium shredder. Chop fine one cup of celery, mix well, and add dressing as desired. Serve on lettuce leaves.

LEFTOVER SALAD
Equal parts of cold carrots and peas. Place on lettuce leaves and serve with cream dressing and chopped nuts.

CUCUMBER SALAD
Cut firm cucumber in thin slices almost all the way through. For thirty minutes place in water to which has been added a little salt. Spread the slices apart and drop thin slices of red radish between. Serve with mayonnaise dressing or pure olive oil.

CARROT AND CABBAGE MOLDS
Grind fine equal parts of carrots and cabbage, and add to carrots chopped raisins, or grind them with carrots. Add to each part cream dressing enough to moisten and press in molds first carrots and raisins, then cabbage and fill the molds. Chill and remove from molds on crisp lettuce, topped with tablespoonful of dressing.

CABBAGE SALAD
Shred 1/2 small head cabbage, 1 large sweet apple, some chopped nuts. Add mayonnaise dressing or apple juice dressing. Mix well and serve on lettuce leaf.

CARROT SALAD
Wash carrots, shred fine or grind. One-half cup raisins and two cups carrots. Pineapple may be used instead of raisins. Mix with dressing and serve.

APPLE, CARROT, AND RAISIN SALAD
1 cup raw grated carrots
1/4 cup seedless raisins
1/2 large apple, chopped or cut in small pieces
Lettuce
Mayonnaise
Mix all ingredients well, add mayonnaise and serve on crisp lettuce. A tablespoonful of groundnuts over all.
Note—Do not overlook those early tender radishes and watercress. Our bodies are in need of these after the winter months.

SLICED CUCUMBER SALAD
Serve thinly sliced cucumber and onions on lettuce leaves. Slit radishes part of the way through, cutting towards the top end. Pull apart slightly and use to garnish the salad. Boiled dressing or mayonnaise can be used.

SUMMER SALAD
1 cup chopped watercress
1/2 cup diced celery
1/2 cup diced cucumbers
Add olive oil for dressing or mayonnaise. Shred radishes over all.

RAW CAULIFLOWER SALAD
Separate firm, crisp cauliflower, place in ice water for three-quarters of an hour, to which has been added a little salt. Serve on crisp lettuce leaves with crushed bananas and whipped cream dressing.

SERBIAN SALAD
1 cup coarsely chopped celery, 1 cup finely shredded cabbage, 1 small onion chopped fine, 1 bunch of radishes, shredded.
Mix well with olive oil. Serve on lettuce.

PINEAPPLE, CARROT JELLO SALAD
Fill Jell-O cup with finely shredded carrots and crushed pineapple. Prepare Hain Vegetable Jell as directed. When partly cooled, pour over the carrot and pineapple cups and cool. Serve on crisp lettuce with either mayonnaise or cream dressing.

DECORATIVE SALADS
The following recipes for decorative salads combine fresh and canned foods in a very delicious way.

BUTTERFLY SALAD
Cut canned sliced pineapple in sufficient semi-circles and wedge-shaped pieces so that you have two semi-circles and two wedges for each salad. Place the two semi-circles of pineapple on a green glass plate, to form the wings of the butterfly. Just below the wings place a wedge-shape piece of pineapple on each side of the butterfly’s body. The body is made by using a small firm banana, and decorating with stripes of pimiento to form the feelers and the stripes on the body. Cut out round pieces of pimiento to represent the eyes. Decorate the wings with strips of pimiento and slices of stuffed olives.

CANDLE SALAD
Place two slices of canned pineapple on a salad plate. On top of the pineapple place a ring of apple with a round hole where the core has been cut out, leaving the red skin on the apple slice. Through this round hole in the pineapple slices and the apple, stand a banana for the candle, with a red cherry on top to represent the flame. If you like, a green handle may be placed on the candleholder, by using half a ring of green pepper. Garnish with crisp lettuce.

ORANGE ROSE SALAD
Remove peeling from oranges, and then carefully remove all the tough white membrane as possible. Separate the corpels, opening them to almost all the way, so that it will have the effect of petals. Fill in the center a tablespoonful of the filling: 1/4 cup raisins, 1/4 cup nuts, 1/4 cup honey. Mix these well. Serve on lettuce leaves.

LIQUID VEGETABLES—RE VITALIZE, RE-CHEMICALIZE:
The Sep-Ro-Siv is excellent for all food grinding. Also, for extracting juice from fruit.

VEGETABLES— THEIR PREPARATION
All vegetables should be un-peeled if possible.
Wash thoroughly. Use these vegetables just as Nature has provided them. If they are boiled or steamed, use as little water as possible, and do not over cook them,
Save all the liquid for drinks or soups.

VEGETABLES
Vegetables our bodyguards and protectors, physicians and nurses, policemen and janitors, builders and faithful servants!
They bring to us the fountain of youth and give us abundant life.

USES IN THE BODY
Vegetables are the natural foods, the true health foods. They serve the body in many ways. They are alkalinizers or sweeteners of the blood stream and body tissues. The minerals they contain help regulate the body processes and help protect from disease. The roughage or indigestible cellulose aids in elimination of wastes. The vitamins give vim and vitality by their protecting and regulating work. They help keep the blood pure and maintain youth. Some vegetables also contain carbohydrates, protein, and small quantities of fat. Thus they aid in the building and repair of tissues and in furnishing heat and energy. The vegetable proteins are easily digested. Beans, peas and lentils, contain proteins, starch and some fat. Potatoes are richest in starch.

PREPARATION
Food and eating are the foundation of health. Therefore one should acquire a working mastery of the art of simple and wholesome cooking. Serve plenty of raw vegetable salads, as there is always some loss of vitamins in cooking. However, care in cooking saves much that is lost through careless handling or lack of knowledge in the fundamentals of vegetable cookery.

Don’t commit the great American sin of cooking vegetables in quantities of water and then throwing away the water. Use small amounts of water for all vegetables. What remains after vegetables are cooked pour in glass containers and use in soups or for a drink for the family.

The minerals contained in vegetables are soluble in water and when you throw them away in the cooking water, you are throwing away your family’s health, their good dispositions, their greatest possible success in life, and your money. All too precious to lose. Cook vegetables in Columbia ware utensils and Pyrex ovenware for baking. Be sure to cover oven dishes to hold all natural moisture of vegetables.

When Wonder Shredders are used, peeling may be left on vegetables. The skin and the layers just under the skin are rich in minerals, especially potassium, the great healing agent of the body.

Scrub the skins with a stiff brush or chore girl, wash well and cut out blemishes so the skins may be eaten with relish.

Do not over cook your food—any vegetable that can be shredded requires less cooking and can be baked in Pyrex ovenware or steamed in kettle with small amount of water.

VEGETABLES—BAKED AND STEAMED
How many of you were told to eat all the carrots on your plate, so that you would have a beautiful complexion? Did you do it? Your e1ders may not have known the mineral and vitamin value of these golden roots as we do now, but they did know that they were beneficial—as they still are.

We don’t want to bore you with details but you should know that one medium-sized carrot contains an excellent share of calcium and sufficient amounts of phosphorus and iron. Along with that, cooked young carrots contain a very large amount of that anti-infection vitamin called A. It is also a good source of Vitamin B, and contains some Vitamin G.

CARROT AND RICE LOAF EN CASSEROLE
1 cup cooked rice
1 cup milk
1 1/2 cups grated carrots
1 egg
1 cup chopped nuts
1 t. salt
1 finely chopped onion
Mix and bake 45 minutes in moderate oven.

CARROTS
Wash and use vegetable brush to cleanse thoroughly. Shred with medium shredder, place in steamer and add two cups of water. Cook for 20 minutes. Add butter when served, or mash and add cream and a little salt to taste.

CARROTS, INCOGNITO
6 large carrots
1/2 cup hot, thin cream
6 large potatoes
3 T. butter
Cook the potatoes and carrots until thoroughly done. Drain and mash separately. Combine and add cream and butter.

BAKED CARROTS
Clean carrots with vegetable brush. Slice lengthwise or slice in circles or cube. Place in Pyrex casserole with butter and 3/4 cup water. Cover and bake in moderate oven I hour.

DRIED CORN
Dried corn may be obtained from Carques’ Pure Food Company, or Hain Pure Food Company. Soak corn in warm water 1 hour then cook slowly. Add cream and butter. Very delicious in winter.

ESCALLOPED CORN
1can No. 2 corn
1/2 cup cracker or bread crumbs
1 egg
1 cup chopped and cooked celery
2/3 cup milk
Alternate corn, celery and cracked crumbs. Top over with plenty of butter. Bake in moderate oven 35 minutes.

STEAMED CORN ON COB
Prepare corn. Place in a steamer and steam 25 minutes, after water comes to a boil. Serve with butter.

BAKED BEET TOPS
Boil equal parts beet tops and Swiss chard. Drain and chop. Braise large onion. Add two cups chopped celery. Mix all together wel1. Put in casserole. Cover with bread or cracker crumbs and dot with butter and bake 30 minutes. Cover the dish. Remove cover the last ten minutes of baking.

BEET GREENS
Boil until tender, about 20 minutes. If there are any tiny beets at the end of the stalk, cook them with greens. Chop and season with butter. One chopped onion may be browned in butter and lard, and then added to the chopped greens. It lends a delicious flavor.

BAKED BEETS
Wash and shred on medium shedder beets enough to fill baking dish. Add a little salt and 1/4 cup water, and top with butter. Bake 45 minutes.

DANDELION GREENS
Wash and remove all sand from greens. Pick the coarse and discolored leaves out. Cook in a large amount of water twice to remove bitter flavor. Drain and add salt and butter and a few drops of hydrochloric acid (dilute).

SWISS CHARD
This is a vegetable that is very little known but is very valuable and is somewhat on the order of spinach. It grows on tall stalks and has large leaves. It really belongs to the spinach family and in fact, as spinach is out of season, the Swiss chard comes in. Swiss chard is the ideal green for the city garden on account of the large supply that can be raised on a small amount of ground. The old way of using chard would be to pull out the plant. The best way is to cut off just as many leaves as you wish to use and let the plant grow. Cut off the outer leaves. You will be surprised how quickly the plant produces new and tender leaves. Chard can be planted real early in the season but must not be sown too close together. In fact, the plants should be at least two inches apart, as they grow to quite a large size, and can be thinned out later on. Since the leaf is large, the green part of the leaf is cut off and can be used the same as spinach or even cut very fine and used in raw salads. The ribs of the leaf and stem can be used as a separate vegetable. It can be cooked like asparagus. It has a very delicious flavor, prepared in this manner. Just remember the green of the leaves provides a good substitute for spinach for the children if the spinach season is over. The chard will grow without much care and under adverse conditions, although with proper care you will be surprised at the heavy foliage, the mass of stems and leaves. Be sure you do not over cook chard as in that way you lose the valuable food elements. If it is cooked too tender, it loses its most valuable flavor. Every home garden should have Swiss chard and use it often for every member of the family.

SWISS CHARD
Wash well and cut out all blemished leaves. Cut if you like before cooking in very little water, or better steamed with water held by leaves. Cook about 15 minutes. Serve with butter or brown some chopped onion, drain chard and chop fine. Mix with onion.

BROCCOLI
Is cooked the same as cauliflower and served with lettuce.

GREEN KALE
Cooked with a piece of boiling beef, green kale is very delicious.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CELERY
1 quart Brussels sprouts
1 1/2 cup celery, chopped
3 T. flour
1 1/2 cup milk
Salt to taste
Cook sprouts until tender. Wash celery and cut in small pieces. Melt butter, add celery, cook three minutes, and then add flour. Pour on gradually the scalded milk and cook until thickened, and then add sprouts and seasoning.

CHINESE CABBAGE
Chinese cabbage may be cooked like cabbage and buttered.

RED CABBAGE—GERMAN STYLE
1 large bead cabbage (red), shredded fine
1 T. lard
2 T. butter
2 large-size onions
1 t. salt
2 tart apples
Do not cook cabbage too long. Put lard and butter in bottom of kettle. Cut onion fine and cook in fat until slightly browned. Then add the cabbage and two cups water. Peel apples and cut fine, or shred and add to cabbage. Cook with cover until tender, about 20 minutes.
This is very good and enjoyed by all.

OAT MEAL WITH APPLE
Oatmeal which has been left over can be made a good dish. Mold it in alternate layers. Slice and steam tart apples, lightly sugar and place between the layers. Serve with cream. Ripe peaches, sliced or stewed fruit may be used.

BROWN RICE WITH FIG SAUCE
Steam the rice. A tasty sauce may be prepared as follows: Cut enough figs to fill a teacup and stew in a pint of water, with one tablespoonful of sugar. When cooked, run through a colander. Dish the rice with ice cream dipper and put a spoonful of sauce with each dish and serve with whipped cream. An excellent dish for breakfast.

RICE
Brown rice is a very easily digested food. It should be rinsed thoroughly and in cooking the water changed frequently until it remains clear.

NEW POTATOES AND STRING BEANS
Steam potatoes and peel. Cook string beans with as little water as possible, to which add 1 cup chopped celery. Make a cream sauce of 2 cups of rich milk, 1 T. butter, and 1 T. cornstarch. Add potatoes and beans to sauce and stir slowly. Top with butter.

GREEN BEANS
Green beans may be cooked like the red cabbage, German style.

CREAMED GREEN BEANS
Cook green beans in small amount of water. When tender, make a cream sauce of 2 T. butter, 2 T. flour, 1 1/4 cups of rich milk. Pour cream sauce over beans and serve hot.

BEANS SAUTE
Cooked beans or home canned 1 quart, 1chopped onion browned in 3 T. lard or butter. Add 1 T. flour and reheat.

BOILED ONIONS
Choose the small white onion. They are not too strong. Cook in boiling water, add salt when nearly done. Drain and serve with butter or cream sauce.

BAKED ONION
Onion may be peeled if desired. Place medium onions in casserole. Add 1/2 cup water and some butter, cover and bake 45 minutes. Onions with peeling may be placed in an open pan and baked, cut open as baked potato and served with piece of butter. Very delicious.

OKRA
Select nice new small okra, cut off top end. Can be steamed or cooked in a little water until soft. Drain, and have cracker crumbs browned in butter. Toss the okra into pan of browned crumbs and serve with butter. Some chopped onion lends a delightful flavor to okra.

OKRA STEWED
Prepare Okra, being sure it is young and tender. Add 1 cup chopped celery and one chopped onion. Stew in small amount of water. When tender, dram and have skillet ready with 1/4 cup melted butter and bread crumbs. Pour the okra, celery and onion over the buttered breadcrumbs and brown well. Serve while hot.

STEAMED CUCUMBERS
If cucumbers are young and tender, do not peel. Wash and cut in rings 1/4-inch thick and place in a saucepan with 1/4 cup water. Cover and cook slowly until tender. Add butter and salt. Serve some chopped onion cooked with the cucumbers, adds a pleasing flavor. A sprinkle of flour will take up some of the moisture.

CREAMED CELERY
Clean celery and dice, or cut in long strips. Cook in little water about 20 minutes. Add a cream sauce or serve with butter. Creamed celery served on warm buttered toast is a real treat for a quick lunch.

STEAMED CAULIFLOWER
Place cauliflower in salt water for 15 minutes. Then cut apart and use all the leaves you can. Cook in very little water or use a steamer. Serve with butter or cream sauce. Cauliflower may be tossed in well-browned cracker or breadcrumbs browned in butter.

PEAS
Early new peas may be steamed and served with a cream sauce or just cream and butter is excellent. When boiled, use small amount of water. Save the liquid.

SUCCOTASH
Take 1 pint of cooked lima beans, 2 pints stewed corn. 1 pint string beans and add a little cream. Let simmer for ten minutes. Add butter and seasoning. Teaspoonful of Celery salt is splendid seasoning. 1/2 clove of garlic may be added to the beans while cooking.

KOHLRABI — TURNIPS — RUTABAGAS
Kohlrabi, white turnips and rutabagas are prepared alike. Either shred or bake in a casserole with cupful of water and topped with butter and covered while baking. Shred and steam, or shred and cook slowly in very little water. Add salt and butter. When mashed, some cream may be added. Dice them and make a cream sauce to pour over them for a change. Season while cooking.

STEAMED SUMMER SQUASH
The round white summer squash is best steamed with a small chopped onion, served with butter, or mashed with butter added.

BAKED SQUASH
Bake squash whole, as it loses its flavor when cut and some of its moisture. When done, cut, remove seeds and scoop out squash, mash and add butter and salt. Cream instead of butter is very good. Then put back in oven to heat.

PEAS
Home-canned peas may be heated and served with butter. Cream sauce may be added for creamed peas. Leftover peas and carrots may be combined, making a colorful and wholesome dish.

BAKED BEANS
Soak beans over night with a little soda. In the morning, drain and boil until tender. Put in baking pan or crock. Add a little chopped celery, a little onion, celery salt and molasses, and a little butter or lard mixed. Bake for four or five hours. Keep adding enough water to keep them moist.

LIMA BEANS WITH PEARS
Soak lima beans over night. Drain. Boil until tender. Salt and put in baking dish with a little chopped celery and onion. For the top layer, slice pears lengthwise and arrange all over top. Sprinkle little brown sugar on pears. Dot with butter and bake.

LENTILS—RICH IN PROTEINS
Wash and soak lentils over night. Cook until tender. Onions may be added when nearly cooked, or chopped celery. Serve with butter. Lentils cooked with fresh pork hock have a delicious flavor.

LENTIL NUT CROQUETTES
1 ½ cups of cooked mashed lentils
18 walnuts, chopped or ground
1 t. salt
3 T. melted fat or butter
1 t. chopped onion
1 1/2 cups breadcrumbs
Mix all ingredients as given above, little water may be added if not quite moist enough. Divide in eight parts, shape into rolls, sprinkle bean flour over them and roll in breadcrumbs. Bake 20 minutes, until brown. May need to turn them.

LENTILS WITH CARROTS
Wash 1 cup of dry lentils, add 5 cups of boiling water, 1 cup of very finely shredded carrots. Cook 1 hour. Add seasoning. 1 1/2 t. salt, 1 small onion cut fine, 1/2 t. celery salt, 4 T. butter or Mazola oil.

VEGETABLE STEAK
Make a stew of chopped celery, onion and carrots; stir in 2 cups of mashed peas. 2 cups beans and 1 cup of breadcrumbs. Form in a loaf or place in a bread pan or casserole. Bake for 1 hour. Slice and serve like a steak. A mushroom and onion sauce adds greatly to the steak. Garnish.

MOCK ROAST
1 cup breadcrumbs
1 cup raw carrots, ground
1 cup raw potatoes ground
2 chopped onions, or 2 stalks leek
2 chopped apples
The apple and onion may be ground and the bread lastly. Mix well. Add 1 t. salt. Bake in a loaf pan 1 hour.

NUT ROAST
1 cup whole wheat bread
1 /2 cup butter crumbs
1/ cup milk
1 cup steamed peas or lentils
1 egg
1 cup ground or chopped nuts
1 t. salt
3 T. minced onions or leek
Mix well and press into greased until a rich brown. Should be served room or other sauce.

POTATOES
Baked potatoes are always the favorite.

POTATO CROQUETTES
3 cups hot riced potatoes
1/2 t. salt
2 T. butter
1/2 t. celery salt
1 grated onion
Roll croquettes in cracker crumbs and fry in butter until light brown.

SCALLOPED POTATOES
If new potatoes, they need not be peeled. Shred on large shredder or slice thin. Place in Pyrex ovenware, add salt and fill dish half full of rich milk. Dot with butter, cover and bake one hour in moderate oven.

POTATO ON HALF SHELL
Select uniform potatoes, bake, while still hot cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out in bowl and mash adding butter and cream to make creamy, salt, and then fill each peeling. Dot with butter and put under broiler until browned.

CREAMED POTATOES
If new potatoes are used, they need not be peeled. Cook until tender. Make cream sauce of 2 cups rich milk, 1 T. butter, 1 T. cornstarch, and 1/4 t. salt. Melt the butter, add flour and seasoning and mix until smooth. Add the milk gradually, stirring until mixture is smooth and thick. Then add potatoes and stir gently so that potatoes are not broken up.

SWEET POTATO WITH PINEAPPLE
6 small sweet potatoes
1/3 as much pineapple, crushed or diced
1 /3 cup honey
1/4 cup water
Boil the potato with the skins on. When cool, peel and cut them in pieces 1/4-inch thick. Mix honey and hot water. Just cover the bottom of a baking dish with the mixture, add a layer of sweet potatoes with the pineapple. Pour the remaining honey mixture over them and bake for ten minutes in oven.

CANDIED SWEET POTATOES
Boil sweet potatoes until almost done. Cut in quarters, lengthwise. Spread on a greased baking dish, sprinkle with brown or raw sugar and dot with butter. Bake in a moderately hot oven until brown, basting often with the liquid in the pan.

BAKED SWEET POTATO
The baked sweet potato, no doubt, is the best. Scrub well with vegetable brush. Oil the potato with Mazola oil, place in baking pan and bake in moderate oven.

MASHED SWEET POTATO
Boil and peel sweet potatoes, mash while warm. Add plenty of butter and enough orange juice to give desired moisture, a little salt and 1 cup of chopped nuts or 1/4 cup of nut butter. If more moisture is desired, add a little cream. One tablespoon of brown sugar improves the flavor. Place in Pyrex ovenware and dot with butter. Bake 20 minutes.

SWEET POTATO PUFFS
4 baked sweet potatoes
1 T. brown sugar
1/2 t. salt
1 T. rich milk or cream
Cut sweet potatoes in half lengthwise, scoop out potato while warm. Put in mixing bowl and add seasoning, milk, butter and sugar. Mash and beat until creamy. One-quarter cup chopped nuts may be added. Pile into the potato skins, dot with butter, and return to the oven to brown.

POTATO NEST WITH PEAS
Mash and season six boiled potatoes, being careful not to add too much cream. Line well-greased muffin pans with the potatoes, leaving a nest in the center. Brush with butter and brown in oven under broiler until a golden brown. Remove carefully to a platter and fill nest with creamed peas or carrots. Garnish with parsley.

SANDWICHES
Fresh wholesome nut butters may be obtained from the Hain Pure Food Company, or Carques’ Pure Food Company, Los Angeles.

NUT SANDWICH
Slice bread quite thin. Spread one slice with butter, on it place two crisp lettuce leaves; on the other slice spread the nut butter. Then fold together and cut crosswise or in fourths. Nice with a vegetable salad, for an evening meal.

NUT AND PRUNE SANDWICH
1 cup chopped pecans or other nutmeats
1 cup chopped or ground sun dried prunes
3 T. salad dressing
Arrange lettuce leaf on buttered toast or plain whole wheat bread and spread filling on bread.

NUT AND FIG SANDWICH
1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup ground or chopped figs
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Mix well and spread on sliced bread and place crisp lettuce leaf between slices, cut in triangles and serve. Bread may be toasted.

NUT AND LETTUCE SANDWICH
Use permissible nut butter, spread on plain or toasted whole wheat or rye bread. Place several crisp lettuce leaves between slices. Cut and serve.

SIXTEEN ELEMENT SANDWICH
Equal parts of celery, cabbage and carrots, ground very fine. Add salad dressing enough to make a spread. Place between two thin slices of bread and crisp lettuce leaf. Onion may be added if desired. Brim full of the necessary vitamins and mineral salts the body is calling for.

CUCUMBER, CELERY AND ONION
Equal parts of cucumber and celery. Small onion. Put through food grinder. Grind very fine. Add enough salad dressing to make a spread. Put a crisp lettuce leaf on each slice of bread before spreading on this mixture.

RAISIN AND NUT SANDWICH
One cup seedless raisins, 1 cup nuts. Run through food chopper, and then mix thoroughly. Add orange juice until spreadable or other fruit juice may be used.

SANDWICH FILLING
1/2 cup figs
1 cup pitted dates
1/2 cup nuts
1/2 cup orange juice
Put fruit and nuts through grinder. Add fruit juice and mix well. Ready to use.

DATE BUTTER
Mash or grind 1/2 pound of seeded dates. Then pour over them two tablespoonful of warm water and beat to a pulp. Add 1/4 pound of nut butter and blend well with the mashed dates. When whole nuts are used, the dates and nuts may be ground together and then mashed. This is a very satisfying spread for the Ry-Krisp cracker or on split bananas, for dessert.

RAISIN SANDWICH FILLING
1/4 cup chopped nuts
1/4 cup ground raisins
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup honey
The raisins and nuts may be ground together. Mix well and add butter and honey. Ready for use. An excellent spread.

 

PUDDINGS:

BROWN BETTY—NO. 1
Pare and slice apples. Put a layer of whole wheat bread squares or crumbs into baking dish, then add a layer of sliced or shredded apples, sprinkle with raw sugar. Then another layer of breadcrumbs and apples and so on until the dish is filled, making the last layer of shredded apple, over which sugar has been sprinkled. Dot well with plenty of butter and pour over all 3/4 cups of sweet apple cider or water. Bake 45 minutes. Serve hot with a simple sauce or apple cider sauce.

APPLE CRUMBLE
Fill a baking dish half full of sliced apples. Add raw sugar over all, then more apples until the dish is filled. Over all sprinkle the following mixture:
3/4 cup flour
1 cup raw sugar
1/2 cup butter
Bake 11/4 hour in moderate oven. May be served with whipped cream or a fruit sauce.

APPLE DUMPLINGS—NO. 1
Wash as many apples as required according to dumplings desired. Core. Fill cavity with chopped nuts or raw sugar. Roll out enough short cake dough or biscuit dough to cover apple, pinch together, place the rough end to the pan and bake in a moderate oven. Serve with a fruit sauce if desired.

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS—NO. 2
2 cups flour
1 1/2 c. baking powder
1/2 t. salt
1/3 cup butter
2/3 cups milk
6 baking apples
Sift dry ingredients together. Cut in butter and add diluted evaporated milk. Roll thin on floured board. Cut in four inch squares Place a pared and cored apple on each square. Sprinkle with Cinnamon and sugar. Pinch corners together bake. Serve with orange sauce. Bake 35 minutes at 375* F. This makes six dumplings.

ORANGE SAUCE
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup butter
2 cups water
Mix ingredients and cook until slightly thickened. Remove from fire and add one tablespoonful orange juice.

DATE PUDDING
2 cups warm milk
1 cup grape nuts
1/2cup dry breadcrumbs or graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup raw or brown sugar
1 t. baking powder
1/4 t. salt
1 cup chopped dates
1/2 cup chopped nut meats
1 egg
Bring milk to a scalding point. Pour over grape nuts and breadcrumbs. Let stand 15 minutes. Beat well with fork. Stir in sugar, baking powder, beaten egg, and salt. Add chopped nuts and dates. Pour into buttered pan. Set in pan of hot water and bake in moderate oven (325° F.) about ¼ hour.

CORN STARCH PUDDING
4 cups scalded milk
1/2 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 t. salt
1/2 cup rich cold milk
1 t. fruit flavoring
Mix cornstarch, sugar, and salt, add 1/2 cup cold milk. Add to scalded milk, stirring constantly until mixture thickens. Fresh crushed fruit with enough sugar to sweeten makes an excellent sauce and flavoring for the pudding.

RICE SURPRISE
2 cups cooked rice
1 cup heavy cream
2 cups diced pineapple or orange
1/2 cup brown sugar
Mix the chilled rice with whipped cream and add diced fruit. Sweeten to taste. Add enough pineapple or orange juice without making it too soft. Should be mixed very lightly. Serve on glass plate.

RICE AND DATE PUDDING
2 cups of cooked rice
1/2 cup chopped dates or raisins
1 cup milk
1/2 cup honey
1 egg, lightly beaten
Mix the slightly beaten egg and milk. Arrange alternate layers of rice and dates or raisins in baking dish. Drizzle honey over each layer of rice. Over top pour the egg and milk and bake 45 minutes in moderate oven.

RICE PUDDING—NO. 1
1/2 cup rice
1 pint sweet milk
Pinch of salt
Wash rice, add salt and milk. Place in oven and bake until tender. Serve with honey and cream.

RICE PUDDING—NO. 2
Boil rice with plenty of water, when water looks milky drain off and put more water on it. Let boil until tender. Turn into strainer and place under cold-water tap to make light. To two cups rice, add 1 1/2 cups rich milk, 1 egg, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of maple syrup. Bake 30 minutes in moderate oven. Serve with caramel sauce or whipped cream.

CARROT PUDDING
1 cup brown sugar or graham flour
1 cup ground or grated raw carrots
1 t. salt
1 t. soda
1 cup ground or grated raw potatoes
1 cup ground suet
1 t. baking powder
1 1/2 cups whole-wheat flour
The raw vegetables and suet may be ground together. Then add salt, sugar, flour, baking powder and soda. Bake 3% hour at 350° F.

APPLE CIDER DRESSING
1 pint sweet cider
1 dessert spoon butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 T corn starch
Boil until it thickens. Pour over each serving of pudding. Fruit sauce will do.

STEAMED
2 cups graham flour
1 T. butter
1 T. lard
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup dates
Steam for two hours.

ORANGE PUDDING
4 cups boiling water
2 cups brown sugar
Grated rind of 2 oranges
2 T. butter
Enough corn starch to thicken (Not too thick)
Let the above mixture cook for fifteen minutes, stirring frequently. When cool, add orange juice, pour into individual molds. Chill and serve with a fruit sauce or whipped cream.

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD PUDDING
3/4 cup apple cider or water
2 apples
2 bananas
1 cup sugar
Cut in cubes 4 slices of whole wheat bread. Place in well-buttered casserole a layer of diced bread sprinkled with brown sugar. Next a layer of shredded bananas and a layer of shredded apple. More brown sugar. Then a layer of diced bread and so on until desired amount is obtained. Lastly the shredded apple, sprinkled with sugar and topped with plenty of butter, Three-quarters of a cup of apple cider or some fruit juice. Bake 3/4 hour 350° F. Serve with a fruit sauce. The apple cider sauce is very good.

STEAMED CARROT PUDDING
2 cups graham flour
1 cup milk
1 T. butter
2 cups bread crumbs
1 T. lard
1/4 t. soda
1 cup brown sugar
2 t. baking powder
1 cup ground or grated raw carrots
1/4 t. salt
1 /2 cup maple syrup
Steam three hours.

DATE PUDDING
1 cup milk
1 cup bread crumbs
1/4 C. soda
2 t. baking powder
1/4 t. salt
1/2 cup Maple syrup

BANANA BREAD PUDDING
Mash 3 ripe bananas; add 2 tablespoonful of brown sugar and 1/2 cup cream. Cut whole wheat bread in squares and dip in above mixtures. Place alternately layers of bread and cut dates until dish is filled. Bake in moderate oven and serve with whipped cream,

BAKED BANANAS
Remove skins from six bananas and cut in halves lengthwise, and put in shallow pan with 2 T., sugar, 1 T. orange juice, few drops of hydrochloric acid (dilute). Dot with butter and bake 20 minutes in slow oven.

SOUTH SEA ISLAND DELIGHT
For Children or Grown ups
Crumble four graham crackers, place in buttered casserole and slice two scraped bananas over them. Mix juice of one medium orange and one-half lemon with two tablespoons brown sugar and pour over bananas. Sprinkle with graham cracker crumbs; dot with butter and bake in moderate oven for 20 minutes. Serve warm or cold, plain or with custard sauce or whipped cream. Serves 4.

RICE AND APPLE PUDDING
Steam one-half pound brown rice until very soft and add one-half pint-scalded milk. Core and slice thin, about three apples. Place in pudding dish; sweeten with brows sugar or honey. Fill the dish with rice and bake one-half hour. Serve with cream or any desired sauce.

FRUIT PUDDING
2 1/2 cups whole-wheat
1/2 cup chopped and seeded dates
1 cup cream
1/4 cup chopped nuts or nutmeats
1/2 cup seedless raisins
Moisten with the cream, and then mix all ingredients well and steam in a double boiler for 40 minutes. Serve with banana dressing.

BANANA DRESSING
2 very ripe bananas
1 T. honey
2 T. cream
1 T. orange juice
Mash the bananas in a bowl with a spoon. Thoroughly mix the ingredients and let the finished dressing stand for 15 minutes before serving. This is an excellent dressing to use for different kinds of salads.

APPLE PUDDING
Slice apples, line bread pan. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup brown sugar and bread or graham cracker crumbs. Add a little water, about 1/4 cup.

Batter
1 cup milk
butter size of walnut
5 T. flour
little salt
1 t. cream of tartar
1/2 t. soda
Pour batter over apples and bake. 30 minutes in moderate oven, 375° F.

BUTTER SCOTCH RICE
1/2cup rice
2 cups scalding milk
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 t. salt
2 T. butter
Wash rice, add scalding milk and put in double boiler. Cream butter, sugar and salt, place over heat, and stir carefully until sugar is melted. When rice is almost tender, add the above mixture and continue cooking until tender. Pour into chilled molds and cool. Turn out and serve with whipped cream.

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE
Make a biscuit dough of:
1 cup graham flour
3 t. baking powder
1 cup white flour
3 T. butter
2 T. brown sugar
1/4 t. salt
1 1/2 cups sweet milk
Bake in hot oven, 450° F., for about 15 minutes. Split the biscuit and butter, spread with crushed strawberries and serve with whipped cream. Any fruit may be used.

RICH SHORT CAKE
2 cups flour, half white, half whole wheat
1/4 cupful milk
1 T. brown sugar
1/2 cup shortening
4 t. baking powder
1/2 t. salt
Mix dry ingredients, sift twice. Work in shortening with fingertips or cut in with two knives, and make into dough with milk. Toss in well-greased pan and pat into place and bake 12 minutes in hot oven, about 450° F. Top with butter when done. Crush and sweeten fruit slightly and put between layers and on top of short cake. Serve with whipped cream or a fruit sauce.

PEACH COBBLER
2 cups pastry flour
3 t. baking powder
1/2 t. salt
1/8cup shortening
3 T. flour
1/8 cup water, mixed with 1/3 cup evaporated milk
6 medium sized peaches, sliced
Sift flour, then measure. Resift with baking powder and salt. Rub shortening into flour. Add diluted milk and mix quickly but thoroughly. The dough should be soft. Combine sugar and flour with sliced peaches. Turn into a buttered baking dish. Cover with biscuit dough rolled about 3/8 to 1/2 inch thick. Cut openings to permit escape of steam. Dough should be drawn firmly to edges of baking dish. Bake about 30 minutes in a hot oven (400° F.)—Six to eight servings.

PEACH BROWN BETTY
Pare and slice about six peaches. Put a layer of breadcrumbs into baking dish, and then add a layer of peaches. Sprinkle with very little brown sugar. Continue filling dish with alternate layers of breadcrumbs and peaches, having the top layer of breadcrumbs. Dot with bits of butter. Pour over 1 cup of hot water and bake 3/4 of an hour. Eat warm with plain sauce.

PEACH SHORTCAKE
1 cups flour
1 quart fresh peaches, sliced
2/3 cup brown sugar.
Pinch salt
2 t. baking powder
1 egg beaten
1 T. melted butter
Sweet milk
Sift flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, together two or three times; put egg, melted butter in cup and fill with sweet milk. Pour this into dry ingredients and stir well. Put enough batter in bottom of buttered baking dish so peaches won’t soak through to the bottom. Now put in your peaches and sweeten to taste; spread remaining batter over top; bake in medium oven until peaches are done. Serve either hot or cold with whipped cream or nutmeg sauce.

DATE SHORTCAKE
1 lb. cooked dates, cooled
1 1/2 cup rolled oats, put through food grinder.
1 cup white flour
1 cup graham flour
1/2 t. soda
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup butter
Mix dry ingredients. Place half the crumbs in a pan, then cooked dates, cover with balance of the crumbs. Bake in a slow oven. Cut in small squares and leave in pan until cool. These are very good.

FILLING
Cook 1 lb. dates with 3/4 cup water and 1/4 cup brown sugar. Add 1/2 cup chopped nuts if desired.

CANTERBURY TARTS
2 cups raisins
5 T. orange juice and grated orange rind
1 1/2 cups sugar
4 graham crackers, rolled
Cook raisins, sugar and orange rind. When done, add orange juice and cracker crumbs. Line pattie tins with rich pie crust paste and bake. Fill with above mixture and serve with whipped cream.

MOCK GINGER BREAD
1 cup molasses
2 cups flour, half whole wheat half white
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup shortening
2 small teaspoons soda
1 egg
1 cup boiling water
Mix ingredients in order listed, dissolving soda in boiling water. Bake in shallow pan in moderate oven. Serve with whipped cream.

 

PIES:

HOT WATER PASTRY
1 cup sifted flour
1/4 cup shortening
1/4 t. salt
1/4 cup boiling water
1/2 t. baking powder
Put shortening in a bowl and pour boiling water over it. Beat until water looks creamy. Add dry ingredients sifted together, all at once and stir until mixture forms a ball and can be handled. Place in frigidaire until thoroughly chilled. Enough pastry for bottom crust of a pie. Bake in a hot oven (4500 F.) for about 13 minutes.

WHOLE WHEAT PIE CRUST
1 1/2 cups flour, half whole-wheat
3/4 cup shortening
4 T. cold water
1 t. salt
Mix quickly and lightly.

GRAHAM CRACKER PIE CRUST
Take 10 double graham crackers and roll into crumbs. Mix with 1/2 cup butter and 1 teaspoonful sugar. Line pie tin with this. 2 tablespoonfuls water may be added. Very good.

GRAHAM CRACKER APPLE PIE
Enough apples for one pie
2 T. butter
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup water
Cook the apples in the sugar and water slowly until nearly done. Add 1 cup of graham cracker crumbs to apples and put into the Graham Cracker Pie Crust. Bake slowly for 1/2 hour. Serve hot with whipped cream.

BANANA CREAM PIE
2 cups milk
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 T. butter
Grated rind of 1 orange
Scald milk in double boiler. Add other ingredients and thicken with 4 tablespoons cornstarch. Have a pie shell baked, or a graham cracker pie crust ready. Line the bottom with sliced bananas. Pour mixture over top of bananas and bake 30 minutes if graham piecrust is used. Serve with whipped cream.

PUMPKIN PIE
2 cups cooked pumpkin
1 cup milk
1 cup brown sugar
2 T. corn starch
2 T. molasses
Mix well. Line pie plate with pie paste and put filling in. Bake until set. Serve with whipped cream.

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE
3 T. butter
1 T. brown sugar
6 T. flour
1/4 t. salt
2 cups rich milk
Cream the flour and butter together. Add the brown sugar and salt. Pour the milk on gradually and cook in a double boiler 15 minutes, stirring constantly until thickened. Turn into a previously baked pie shell and when cool, top with whipped cream.

RAISIN PIE
1 1/2 cups seeded raisins
1/2 cup finely chopped or ground nuts
1 1/2 cups boiling water
1 T. flour
1 T. orange juice, grated rind of 1/2 orange
1/2 cup brown sugar
Wash and cook raisins in boiling water until tender.
Mix the flour and sugar and add to the cooked raisins, stirring until it thickens. Add the grated orange and nuts, cool slightly, and then add orange juice. Bake in a double piecrust in oven at 425° F. Reduce heat during last 10 minutes.

ORANGE CREAM PIE
4 cups boiling water
Grated riced of 2 oranges
2 1/2 cups brown sugar
2 T. butter
Enough cornstarch to thicken, not too thick, about 7 T.
Let cook for 15 minutes, add the brown sugar, 2 T. butter and the cornstarch, until it thickens. When partly cool, fold in 1 cup of whipped cream and pour into a previously baked pie shell. Cool and serve.

HUCKLEBERRY ROLL
1 cup flour, half whole-wheat, and white flour or graham
2 t. baking powder
1 3/4 cups milk
1 t. salt
1 cup shortening
Mix all dry ingredients; add liquid to make a soft dough. Roll out, thin, and put on berries and sprinkle with brown sugar. Roll up like jelly roll and bake in moderate oven. This can be made with any kind of berries and fresh permissible fruits in season. Serve with a fruit sauce or whipped cream.

APPLE FRITTER
1 1/3 cup flour
1/4 t. salt
2 t. baking powder
2/3 cups milk
1 egg
1 T. sugar
Mix dry ingredients; add milk and egg, well beaten. Slice apples into batter and drop by spoonfuls into deep hot Mazola Oil. Serve with sauce.

BANANA FRITTERS
1 cup flour
1/4 cup milk
2 t. baking powder
1 egg
1 T. brown sugar
1 T. orange or pineapple juice
1/4 t. salt
3 bananas
Mix and sift dry ingredients. Beat egg until light, add milk, and combine mixture. Then add fruit juice and bananas forced through a sieve. Drop by spoonfuls into deep hot fat or Mazola Oil. Fry until a golden brown and drain.

CORN FRITTERS
2 cups corn, drained
1 beaten egg
2 t. baking powder
1 t. salt
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup rich milk
1 T. melted butter
Sift dry ingredients together, add liquids and corn. Beat well and drop by spoonfuls in deep hot fat (365′ F.). Brown well and serve with maple syrup.

CARROT FRITTERS
2 cups of shredded cooked carrots
2 T. baking powder
1 cup of carrot liquid
1 T. sugar
Flour 1/2 t. salt
Add enough flour to liquid to thicken, and then add the above ingredients to the batter. Cook in deep fat, “Pure Lard.”

CEREAL CROQUETTES
To 1 cup of leftover cereal. Add 1 cup chopped peanuts or any other nuts. 1/2 cup toasted breadcrumbs. 1 well-beaten egg. Mix and moisten with milk to desired consistency. Shape into croquettes and bake in oven until brown on both sides. Serve with jelly or thick fruit sauce.

 

CAKES:

PLAIN CAKE
1 cup brown sugar
1 banana crushed
1 T. butter
Cream the above ingredients together.
1 cup milk
1 cup graham flour
1/2 t. soda
2 t. baking powder
Add to first part and bake in moderate oven.

Filling
One and one-half cups brown sugar and a little water. Boil until it will form a ball in cold water: add a little cream and beat.

BANANA CAKE
1 heaping cup brown sugar
1 cup crushed banana
3/4 cup butter melted and creamed
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
2 t. baking powder
2 T. sweet milk
1/4 t. salt
Mix in order given and bake in moderate oven.

DATE CAKE
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 package dates
1 cup brown sugar
2 cups whole wheat flour or graham flour
1 cup sweet milk
2 t. baking powder
Cream butter and sugar. Mix dates, beat well and bake in moderate oven. Left over cake may be reheated, cut in squares and served with hot apple cider sauce as a pudding.

SUPREME ICE-BOX CAKE
1/3 cup butter
1 cup drained crushed pineapple
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1/2 cup chopped nutmeats
20 Supreme Honey-flavored Graham Crackers
3/4 cup whipped cream
Cream butter and sugar. Add nuts and pineapple, and blend thoroughly. Cover bottom of loaf pan with the crushed graham cracker and whipped cream. Then a layer of the fruit mixture, alternating layers until pan is full. Top layer should be crackers. Chill in icebox five or six hours, and serve with whipped cream.

APPLE SAUCE SUPPER
3 cups applesauce
1 cup chopped figs
1 cup raisins
1/4 t. anise seed
2 cups chopped celery
Cook all together for 30 minutes. Chopped pecans are sometimes added. When you have had an unusually heavy dinner, this makes an ideal supper meal for both old and young.

APPLE SAUCE CAKE
1/3 cup shortening
1 cup white flour
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup whole wheat dour
1 1/2 cups thick sweetened
1 c. soda
apple sauce
1/4 t. salt
1 cup raisins
Cream shortening and sugar together, and then add the applesauce. Mix and sift flour, soda and salt, then add raisins dredged lightly with flour. Mix well. Bake in well greased loaf pan at 375* F. for about 40 minutes.

ICE BOX COOKIES
2 cups brown sugar
2 cups whole-wheat flour
1 cup butter or pure lard or half and half
2 cups white flour
1 t. soda dissolved in water
3/4 cups raisins
Mix well and mold in rolls. Place in ice box for an hour then cut chin slices and bake, 450° F. for about 12 minutes.

PLAIN COOKIES
2 cups brown sugar
2 t. baking powder
1 cup butter
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
Pinch salt
1/2 cup white flour
1 cup hot milk, poured over ingredients.
Mix these together well ingredients. Stir all the flour you can into mixture and let stand over night. Roll out and bake in moderate oven.

WHOLE WHEAT FRUIT COOKIES
4 lbs. whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 oz. chopped nuts
4 oz. shortening
1/2 lb. chopped figs pitted dates and seedless raisins, mixed
1 cup hot water
Melt shortening and honey with hot water. Stir in flour, nuts and fruit. Add more hot water if necessary to form a stiff dough. Bake in rock form in a moderately hot oven about 45 minutes.

OATMEAL COOKIES—NO. I
3 1/2 cups oatmeal
1/2 cup lard
1 cup white flour
3 t. baking powder
1 cup graham flour
1/4 t. soda
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 t. salt
1/2 cup butter
Mix all dry ingredients and add milk last.

Filling
1 lb. dates
1 cup water
1 T. brown sugar

OATMEAL COOKIES—NO. 2
1/2 cup butter
1/4 t. cinnamon
1 1/4 cups brown sugar
3/4 cup coconut
2 eggs
1/2 cup Libby’s Evaporated Milk
1 t. soda
1 t. baking powder
1 t. vanilla
1/2 cup raisins
2 cups oatmeal
Cream butter and sugar. Add beaten eggs. Sift dry ingredients. Add alternately with milk to first mixture. Add vanilla, oatmeal and raisins. Stir to mix. Drop from spoon to buttered baking sheet. Time for baking, 10 to 12 minutes. Temperature 400° F. Amount—45 cookies.

 

FRUIT SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS:

Save any fruit juice chat you have, strawberry, pineapple, cherry. etc.
One cup fruit juice mixed with a cup of water and a tablespoonful of butter thickened with two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch will make fruit sauce for any kind of pudding.

APPLE CIDER SAUCE
1 Pt. sweet cider
1 cup brown sugar
1 dessertspoonful of butter
2 T. cornstarch
Heat the cider; butter and sugar, then add the cornstarch, to which has been added 3 tablespoonful of water.

MAPLE NUT SAUCE
1 cup coffee cream
1 t. maple flavoring
2 T chopped nutmeats
Mix the ingredients.

HOT MAPLE SAUCE
1-cup water
2 cups brown sugar or maple sugar
1/2 cup chopped nutmeats
Flavor with maplene
Add water to the sugar and boil until it reaches the ‘thread” stage. Add the nutmeats.

FOAMY SAUCE
1cup butter
1 egg
1cup brown sugar
2 T. hot water
1 t. maplene or fruit flavoring
Cream the butter and add sugar, the egg well beaten, and the hot water. Heat over hot water heating continually until it thickens. Add the flavoring.

BANANA SAUCE OR DRESSING
2 very ripe bananas
2 T. cream
1 T. honey
1 T. orange juice
Mash bananas in a bowl with a spoon. Thoroughly mix the other ingredients and let the finished dressing stand 15 minutes before serving. Excellent dressing to use for different kinds of salads.

CREAMY SAUCE
1 T. butter
1 t. brown sugar
2 heaping T. flour
Maplene for flavoring
1 cup of rich milk
Rub the flour and butter together. Add cup of boiling milk: cook a little while. Add sugar and flavoring. This is a delicious sauce, hot or cold for any pudding.

VEGETABLE SAUCE WHOLE WHEAT SAUCE FOR VEGETABLES
Cream 4 level teaspoonfuls of butter and 3 level teaspoonfuls of whole-wheat flour. Add 2 cups of warm milk, and stir constantly over the fire until thick. Add a third of a teaspoonful of celery salt, salt to taste. Where creamed vegetables are desired. This sauce may be used. For a richer sauce, use half cream and half milk.

THIN WHITE SAUCE
1 T. butter or Mazola Oil
1/4 t. salt
1 T. flour
1cup milk
Melt the butter in top of double boiler. Add flour and seasoning and mix until smooth. Add the milk gradually, stirring constantly until mixture is smooch. Medium white sauce can be obtained by adding to above recipe an extra tablespoonful of flour and butter.

MUSHROOM SAUCE
2 T. butter or other fat
1/2 t. salt
2 T. whole-wheat flour
1 small chopped onion
1/2 lb. mushrooms
1/4 cup chopped celery
Brown butter and flour, add onion, celery and mushrooms, and then add 1 1/2 cups meat stock. Cook.

 

FROZEN DESSERTS:

FROZEN DESSERTS ARE NOT RECOMMENDED
It takes forty-five minutes for the digestive juices to sufficiently heat for digestion after Ice Cream or Ices have been eaten.

VANILLA ICE CREAM
I qt. thin cream (scalded and cooled)
3/4- cup sugar
1 1/2 T. vanilla
Mix ingredients and freeze. A few grains of salt are an improvement to any ice cream.

BUTTERSCOTCH ICE CREAM
3 T. butter
1/4-cup brown sugar
1-cup milk
1-1/2 T. cornstarch, stirred smooth in 2 T. cold milk
1/4- t. Vanilla
1-cup whipping cream
Pinch salt
Cook butter and sugar in top of double boiler until mixture is melted and well blended. Add milk and heat to boiling point. Stir in cornstarch and salt and cook until mixture thickens. Cool. Add flavoring and fold in whipped cream. Pour in Kelvinator tray and freeze. Makes 1 quart.

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM
3 pints thin cream
2 cups sugar
2 boxes berries
Few grains salt
Wash and hull berries, sprinkle with sugar, cover, and let stand two hours. Mash, and squeeze through cheesecloth; then add salt. Freeze cream to the consistency of a mush, add gradually fruit juice, and finish freezing. Rich milk may be substituted for cream.

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM (With Custard Base)
2 cups milk
1 egg
1 T. cornstarch or flour
Few grains salt
1-cup sugar
1 to 2 qts. strawberries
1-quart thin cream
Wash berries and put through a sieve. Follow directions for making vanilla ice cream. Then add sugar to sweeten the washed strawberries. Let stand one hour. Add to the ice cream mixture just before freezing.

FRESH FRUIT RINGS
1 qt. raspberries or strawberries
8 t. confectioner’s sugar
1 t. vanilla
2 cups whipping cream
Whip cream until it will just hold its shape. Fold in sugar and vanilla and pour into 8 individual ring molds, place in two Frigidaire trays and freeze. When ready to serve un-mold and fill centers with thoroughly chilled fruit.

FRESH STRAWBERRY CAKE
1 1/2 cups crushed strawberries
2/3-cup sugar
Juice of one orange
3 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/2-cup cream
1 T. maplene flavoring
Combine all ingredients in order listed and blend well. Pour in freezing tray and freeze in Frigidaire about three hours. Cut in squares and serve with whipped cream. Serves 10.

ICE CREAM CLOWNS
Amusing refreshments for tiny tots
Arrange two scoops of ice cream one on top of the other to form a ball. Make clown face, using raisins and nuts. Cock ice cream cone on side for clown hat. Serve immediately.

BANANA ICE CREAM
Combine 6 crushed bananas with 1-cup sugar, the juice of 1 orange. Stand thirty minutes. Add 4 cups milk and 1 cup cream. Mix thoroughly and then freeze as usual.

CARAMEL ICE CREAM
Caramelize 1/2-cup sugar till dark brown. Add to one-quart milk and 3/4-cup sugar. Stir till sugar is dissolved. Cool and add 1-cup cream to the mixture. Freeze in the usual manner.

PINEAPPLE ORANGE ICE CREAM
Combine 1 cup crushed pineapple, the juice of 2 oranges and of 1/2 lemon and 1 cup of sugar. Stand 1/2 hour to blend flavors. Add 4 cups milk and 1 cup thin cream. Freeze.

GRAPE ICE
2/3-cup sugar
1/4-cup orange juice
1 cup grape juice
1-1/2 cups water
Boil the water and sugar for 5 minutes. Mix all the ingredients together, strain and freeze.

PINEAPPLE SHERBERT
1 1/2 cups shredded fresh pineapple
1 cup sugar
1egg white
2 cups water
Boil sugar and water for 10 minutes, cool, add pineapple and pour into refrigerator tray. When frozen to a mushy consistency remove to a chilled bowl and beat vigorously. Add stiffly beaten egg white and blend well. Return to tray and finish freezing. Makes 1 quart.

PINEAPPLE ICE
2 oranges
1/2 cup honey dissolved in 1 lemon
2 cups water
1 cup pineapple juice
1 t. Nu-Vege-Sal.
Beat until well blended, add Nu-Vege-Sal and freeze.

APPLE BUTTER MOUSSE
2 cups applesauce
1/2 cup melted butter
2 cups rolled graham cracker crumbs
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Mix the above ingredients well and chill in small loaf pan two hours. Slice as brick ice cream and serve with whipped cream.

PRUNE LOAF
2 cups cooked prunes
2 T. vegetable gelatin
1/2-cup raisins
1 cup orange juice
1/2-cup nuts
1 cup boiling water
1/2-cup sugar
Grated rind of one orange
Cut prunes in pieces. Mix with chopped nuts and raisins. Soak gelatin in one half-cup cold water and dissolve in boiling water. Add juice, sugar and grated rind. Cool. As it begins to congeal, add fruits and nuts. Mix well and chill thoroughly. Slice and serve with whipped cream.

GRAHAM CRACKER ICEBOX PUDDING
Dissolve 1 package of vegetable gelatin in 1 cup cold water. Add 3 1/2 cups boiling water and 1 cup brown sugar and maplene for flavoring. Put part of mixture in a pan to set, adding a few chopped dates and 1/2 cup chopped nuts. When it is set, put a layer of graham cracker crumbs and dates on top and then pour over the remainder of gelatin mixture. Put in icebox to chill. Turn out of mold and cut in squares and serve with whipped cream.

FIG-ALMOND CONFECTION
1-pound sun dried figs
1/4 pound almond butter
2 ounces almonds
Cut the figs in pieces, mix with almonds and put through food chopper. Then work into the mass the almond butter, mixing thoroughly. Roll out and cut into squares.

PEANUT BUTTER CONFECTION
1 lb. seeded dates
1 T. peanut butter
Put dates through food chopper, using fine cutter, and work them into the peanut butter. Roll out and cut into squares. Any nut butter may be used.

PRUNE-WALNUT CONFECTION
Equal parts pitted prunes and dates and one-third as many walnuts. Mix together and run through food chopper, roll out and cut into squares.

MEXICAN PENUCHI
2 cups brown sugar
1 1/2 cups pecan meats
1 cup milk
1 t. vanilla
1 T. butter
Cook the milk and sugar until the sugar dissolves. Increase the heat and boil until it forms a soft ball when dropped in cold water. Remove from fire and add butter, but do not stir. When luke warm add vanilla and beat until creamy. Add the nutmeats and spread in buttered pan. When cold cut in squares.

RAISIN NUT BARS
1 cup shelled Brazil nuts
1/2 cup grated coconut
2 T. honey
1 cup shelled pecans
1 cup shelled walnuts
2 cups seedless raisins
Run the nuts and raisins through a food chopper. First separately, then together with honey in order to thoroughly blend the ingredients. Form into balls about 3/4 inch in diameter and roll in grated coconut to give them an attractive appearance

HONEY DROPS CONFECTION
1 cup shredded coconut
1 cup strained honey
1 box seeded raisins, or 1 cup chopped dates
Moisten with coconut milk or cream. Drop the mixture from a spoon in shallow pan and bake 20 minutes in moderate oven.

 

MEAL PLANNING

The most important point to remember in meal planning is to serve plenty of alkaline foods—vegetables, fruits, and nuts. In planning, consider how the meal will look and taste when served. Do not over cook your food. Cabbage and greens can be cooked in 15 minutes. Use very little water and do not drain water from vegetables in sink. This water, kept in glass jars, make excellent drinks or soups for the family. Plan your meals a day ahead. With so many colorful vegetables as we now enjoy, one can carry out a very pretty and effective color scheme enjoyed by those in health and tempting for the invalid. It is best not to drink with the meal. Wait at least 30 minutes.

 

MENUS

BREAKFAST NO. 1
Baked Apple
Oat Meal
Cream Mo-ko

BREAKFAST NO. 2
Soaked sun dried figs
Honey or Maple syrup
Whole-wheat waffles
Cream and hot water
Butter
Mo-ko

BREAKFAST NO. 3
Soaked sun dried prunes
Corn cakes
Butter
Honey
Maple Syrup
Mo-ko

BREAKFAST NO. 4
Sliced Bananas
Cream
Thin, well dried whole wheat toast
Butter
Mo-ko

LUNCH NO. I
Corn on cob
String beans
Carrot and pineapple Jell-O salad
Hot biscuits
Honey and butter

LUNCH NO. 2
Potato on half shell
Steamed cucumbers
Red cabbage salad
Whole wheat bread
Butter
Apple fritters with sauce

LUNCH NO. 3
Cream of Pea Soup
Mashed rutabagas
Parsnip and celery
Orange roe salad
Pecan nut sandwiches

LUNCH NO. 4
Barley Soup
Creamed carrots
Celery Apple salad
Brussels Sprouts
Rye Bread
Butter
Banana Cream Pie

DINNER NO. 1
Baked squash
Creamed peas
Scalloped corn
Lettuce and Radish salad
Bran Muffins
Butter
Orange Pudding

DINNER NO. 2
Baked Potatoes
Baked Beets
String Beans
Cabbage and Celery salad
Whole-wheat bread and butter
Rice and date pudding
Whipped Cream

DINNER NO. 3
Mock Roast
Shredded Carrots
Cauliflower
Swiss Chard
Corn Muffins and butter
Banana Salad

DINNER NO. 4
Sweet potato puffs
Lima beans
Cucumber and radish salad
Beet top greens
Oat meal bread and butter
Carrot pudding

 

HELPFULL AND VALUABLE ITEMS

The Wonder Shredder
Sep-Ro-Sir, juice extractor and
Stainless steel cooking utensils
Superior Steam Cooker
Mazola Oil
V-M Organic Tea for health
Kingford Starch
Mo-Ko Coffee
Ry-Krisp
Roman Meal
Otto Carque Pure Food Company or
Hain Pure Food Company, for
All sun dried fruits,
Nut butters, vegetable jell
Natural sweetened canned fruit
Royal Baking Powder, or
Dr. Price’s Baking Powder
Pillsbury’s Flour
Pillsbury’s Bran
Health Culture Skin Food Cream
Appledoorn’s Clover Honey
Patapar Paper for Cooking
Vegetable grinder

MO-KO
THE PERFECT HEALTH DRINK

MO-KO is made from the choicest cereals, skillfully combined, ground, roasted and blended together making a most delicious food drink.

People who appreciate good health should discard all injurious beverages, such as tea and coffee as they are positively harmful to the human system and in a very short time will produce nervousness, headache, indigestion, sleeplessness and heart trouble.

MO-KO has been on the market for over 30 years and its dietetic excellence has been recognized by food authorities and dietitians and is being used more and more freely.

People who find it difficult to give up coffee will appreciate the delicious coffee-like flavor of MO-KO with its rich, golden brown color and delightful aroma.

FOR BASIC NUTRITION
Balances Nutrition

These contents are in such proper proportions as to tend to correct the unbalanced diet of individuals and thereby to normalize body nutrition. Unbalanced diet might be due to dislike for certain essential Vitamin-carrying foods; might be due to inability to eat these necessary foods—but is generally due to deficiency of Essentials in available foods.

General body nutrition is increased by its use and in consequence resistance to infection is built up in the body—thereby reducing the severity of illness due to infection. Recovery from illness is hastened by its use because of its stimulating effects upon the appetite, and its nourishing influence upon the cells of the body.

Colleague Publications